Vermont Horseback Riding Trails and Maps

178 Reviews

Looking for the best Horseback Riding trails around Vermont?

Find the top rated horseback riding trails in Vermont, whether you're looking for an easy short horseback riding trail or a long horseback riding trail, you'll find what you're looking for. Click on a horseback riding trail below to find trail descriptions, trail maps, photos, and reviews.

City Trails and Maps in Vermont

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Activities
Length
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7 Results
Activities
Length
Surfaces
Type

Alburg Recreational Rail-Trail

3.5 mi
State: VT
Ballast, Cinder

Cambridge Greenway

1.4 mi
State: VT
Crushed Stone, Gravel

Cross Vermont Trail

87.4 mi
State: VT
Asphalt, Concrete, Crushed Stone, Dirt, Grass, Gravel

Cross Vermont Trail (Montpelier & Wells River Trail)

22.9 mi
State: VT
Ballast, Dirt, Gravel, Sand

Delaware and Hudson Rail-Trail

25.8 mi
State: NY, VT
Asphalt, Cinder, Dirt, Grass, Gravel

Lamoille Valley Rail Trail

34.2 mi
State: VT
Crushed Stone, Gravel

West River Trail

16.1 mi
State: VT
Asphalt, Dirt, Gravel, Sand
Trail Image Trail Name States Length Surface Rating
Nestled in the remote, lake-filled region of northwestern Vermontjust a few miles from the Canadian borderis the short and easy-to-overlook Alburg Recreational Rail-Trail. But you won't want to...
VT 3.5 mi Ballast, Cinder
Cambridge Greenway hugs the Lamoille River through the village of Jeffersonville in northern Vermont, about 30 miles northeast of Burlington. It is a four-season trail, popular with cross-country...
VT 1.4 mi Crushed Stone, Gravel
The Cross Vermont Trail (CVT) is a statewide route that links a number of Vermont trails and includes on-road sections. As of January 2016, 87 miles of trail are built and scattered across the state....
VT 87.4 mi Asphalt, Concrete, Crushed Stone, Dirt, Grass, Gravel
Locals lovingly describe the Cross Vermont Trail as a patchwork quilt that will ultimately form a 90-mile trail from Lake Champlain in the west to the Connecticut River in the east. A component of the...
VT 22.9 mi Ballast, Dirt, Gravel, Sand
The Delaware and Hudson Rail-Trail follows the flowing contours of the western Vermont countryside, rambling in and out of New York state, where you’ll find a 4-mile gap. This border area is known as...
NY, VT 25.8 mi Asphalt, Cinder, Dirt, Grass, Gravel
The Lamoille Valley Rail Trail (LVRT) is a growing, year-round trail across northern Vermont that will one day stretch 93 miles between St. Johnsbury and Swanton. The trail passes through the spine of...
VT 34.2 mi Crushed Stone, Gravel
The West River Railroad, which once followed its namesake river for 36 miles, began passenger service in the late 1800s as a way to trim the two-day voyage between Brattleboro and South Londonderry to...
VT 16.1 mi Asphalt, Dirt, Gravel, Sand

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Recent Trail Reviews

Missisquoi Valley Rail-Trail

A perfect trail

September, 2018 by robert.richter89

I rode the entire trail starting in St. Albans and ending at Richford for a total of roughly 26.5 miles each way. The entire trail is well marked and is in near perfect condition. The trail is overall flat but there are sections that do have a grade to them which caught me by surprise going up and then coasting down them. The scenery varies from forest to rural farmland with Enosburg acting as a halfway point for refreshments.

There are a good amount of road crossings but the trail is always easy to find and I found that most of the crossings had very little to no traffic on them even on Labor Day Weekend. There are sections of this trail that do not offer much shade which may pose a problem on a very hot day. Overall I think this trail offers the perfect combination of scenery, ease of riding and a trail that is in very good condition.

Hoot, Toot and Whistle Trail

Rock, Root, and Tree

September, 2018 by jennifer81

This trail is not at all as described. It started off on crushed gravel for a few hundred yards. As soon as it entered the woods it became a foot path of a nearly contiguous stretch of single-track biking with (occasionally without) large roots and rocks to navigate. We walked our bikes more than we rode them and went a half mile without getting to the reservoir before finally turning around.

Island Line Rail Trail

beautiful ride

August, 2018 by leogirl1968

Beautiful trail. I would suggest parking at the Causeway Bike Path Parking lot. We parked at Oakledge Park and headed out. Very busy in a few spots. Never actually made it all the way to the end, we were about 3 miles shy. When we arrived back at our vehicle we had a little tag on our windshield as did many other cars stating we parked without a pass and needed to pay. We rolled right in the park and NOWHERE did we see a sign that said you needed a pass or pay to park. Otherwise the trail is very busy but really beautiful and not too hard.

Accordion

Valley Trail

Not as advertised

August, 2018 by sarah65

We rode part of this trail while doing some single track riding on the Crosstown trails in West Dover, which connects with this trail. This is not a family friendly paved trail which is the impression I had from the description. I am glad I didn't plan to ride it from Dover to Wilmington with my 9 year old. The part of the trail we saw was single track comparable to a hiking trail. It is not wide, not flat, and not smooth. It is narrow, windy, and filled with rocks and roots. It is not appropriate for little kids or bike trailers.

The Crosstown trails in this area are wide gravel paths. Great for kids who can make it up a decent hill. The single track in the area is nice. It needs some trail maintenance and reroutes along with clearing and trimming. Some areas are nice to ride, others are a mess of roots which are difficult. The trails on the map were very well mapped. It was a nice find on a trip to the area, we will be back!

Valley Trail

NOT ASPHALT!

August, 2018 by mmmzr

NOT ASPHALT! Only one small section (1.5 miles) in Dover is paved... ended up biking Rt100 from Wilmington to Mt. Snow, not much of a shoulder but not much traffic and pretty flat.. nice scenery!

Alburg Recreational Rail-Trail

Alburg recreational rail-trail

August, 2018 by jeanarchibald8

This was a great little trail for an 89 yr old who wanted something short and flat. Parking good at both ends Surface well maintained but not good for bikes with thin tires. Watch out for the the bridge at near end, which is appropriate only for snowmobiles, walk it with your bike. A number of roots caused a bump, but they were quite passable. There is a beautiful view of wildlife in water at one end, saw ducks, great blue heron,hawk above.

Cross Vermont Trail (Montpelier & Wells River Trail)

Went the 22.7 miles on Hybrid bikes with my beautiful wife; she's 50 and I'm 55. Great trail but a bit rough for hybrid bikes. Beautiful vistas with ponds, pine trees and mountains in the background.

August, 2018 by garycaisse

Went the 22.7 miles on Hybrid bikes with my beautiful wife; she's 50 and I'm 55. Great trail but a bit rough for hybrid bikes. Beautiful vistas with ponds, pine trees and mountains in the background.

Lamoille Valley Rail Trail

Pat

August, 2018 by patsyfrench

I love the rail trail. I walk 4 miles almost every day. But this year the trail is not being maintained as well as previous years. I walk mainly between mile marker 56 & 58. It has been mowed only once this year and it was a pretty bad job. Right now there is rag weed, Golden rod, queens lace and other weeds that cause people with allergies to flare up over 2 feet high. I actually have a terrible case of vertigo that my doctors feel has been caused by allergies. The mowing machine actually leaves a wide patch of unmowed area that I assume is a result of a damaged blade. This years maintenance has been a disappointment.

Valley Trail

Very Misleading Entry

August, 2018 by chuck1956

The entry leads you to believe there is a 9 mile asphalt trail linking two towns in a Vermont valley with just a small gap near the north end. Unfortunately, there is no such thing. The trail is a very confusing series of blue signs which go through the woods on dirt (mud) tracks, over grass lawns with no identifiable trail, and on busy and narrow town roads (the only asphalt on the trail). Talking to locals, we discovered that parts of the trail are used for mountain biking, but that the idea of a continuous trail linking West Dover and Wilmington is a dream that has yet to be realized.

West River Trail

Appears to be alot of conflict with landowners

June, 2018 by gregswild

The trail definitely has some potential if there was more participation from landowners, some of whom appear to be quite hostile to the idea. It appears that the trail did or attempted to cross through private land on the Townsend section northward towards a connection with the Jamaica section but you soon run into a labyrinth of blocked trail and more No Trespassing and Posted signs than I have ever seen in one spot anywhere in my life. They did dissuade me that day and I turned around which is most unfortunate. Laws being what they are in Vermont, there is nothing illegal about this of course. In many states, including Texas surprisingly there is a law against closing off a certain amount of shoreline areas to passersby and swimmers etc. in order to promote this activity which is ultimately beneficial to all, locals and visitors alike.

Cross Vermont Trail (Montpelier & Wells River Trail)

Through Groton State Forest

June, 2018 by kerund

Rode a hybrid the approx.12 mile stretch out and back between Rts. 302 and 2. This is not a typical rail trail with a uniform surface. It’s a dirt surface with occasional protruding rocks. Not for road tires or slicks. That said, the surface and trail conditions were good and it was easy to maintain a nice pace.

This stretch is essentially two long but very gradual hills. The trail is shaded throughout and travels through beautiful forest, past streams and wetlands with occasional views of ponds.

The trail is quiet and secluded but nearby state park campgrounds are easy to reach and there’s a short side trail to Kettle Pond. Looking forward to riding this trail again - after the black flies have flown south for the winter.

Island Line Rail Trail

Carmenza rolls in Burlington for the first time in 28 years

April, 2018 by unusedfun

Since I left for college my home town of Burlington, Vermont has developed with thoughtful civic prosperity.

One element of this peaceful, intelligent town is vast improvement in the public interest of the spectacular waterfront along Lake Champlain ("The West Coast of New England"). World class facilities are taking shape on the edge of this iconic water that was once part of an inland sea. There is a deeply nuanced museum (ECHO) for families that interprets the wilderness that is the lake and its many tributaries. There is also a very nice skateboard park and open recreational spaces.

My dad and I chose the waterfront park as our starting point. This is a nicely paved section that rides fast and polite. Although I saw quite a few full dog waste bags along the sides of the trail I did not see any dogs in 22 miles of riding, and no waste on the trail.

Very quickly all signs of the city almost vanish and having escaped the shelter of the harbor breakwater one starts to notice the subtle sound of waves lapping against the beach to the west. April is a great time to ride this trail for the diversity of flora and fauna. The birds were spectacular.

We took a short break at North Beach and met up with my best friend of 40 years and continued our push to the North end of the causeway. He encouraged us to pause and absorb our sacred lake. When you grow up on a major body of water it dominates every fiber of your soul. The power of water cannot be underestimated. It's physical properties defy our best efforts to control it. Bowing in respect for this energy we established cadence and a pedal drive North.

The sky was cold sapphire blue. Also spectacular were the Ice formations that encased the west side of the causeway after we crossed the Winooski River on a rusty but happy Iron truss bridge.

What was spectacular in a relatively cold and slightly discouraging way was the 40mph cross wind we had to fight all the way to the winter terminus of the causeway. In summer there is a little pedestrian/bike ferry that jumps the old swing bridge gap and allows riders to access South Hero and Grand Isle.

Anyhow, we battled the wind at a 5 degree cant. All of us leaning into the wind and hoping it wouldn't throw us in the lake or on to the causeway fill off the side of the (very nice) smooth cinder trail. There is no easy emergency exit at any point on the causeway. You are almost guaranteed a trip to the hospital if you wipe out and go off the trail. Please be very careful on the Causeway, especially with children. There is a lot of opportunity for self destruction caused(wayed;-) by inattention.

The thrill is entirely worth the ride, even with unfavorable wind. Our views of the Greens and the Dacks and the birds and the islands and the the the...

You get it.

It is a wilderness experience in the city.

We eventually reached the swing bridge pier. Staring out over the north country virtually speechless for the privilege of the experience. Reconciliation of my relationship with Burlington...with my childhood.

I now know that I do not need to worry about returning to my birth home. Hiding out west for 28 years gave me perspective on what I left behind. What I see in my home state is the prospect of adventure, and I hope to get back a bit more frequently in the next 28 years. When I moved West I found sanctuary in the vast wilderness, climate diversity and sparse population centers. It was a huge change from living in the Northeast.

Now, the Northeast has changed dramatically. The population has embraced technology and the impending, changing future. Everything seems fresh with fresher on the way soon. New open space is becoming accessible every day. It is inspiring to see how the communities of New England have embraced their history, and continue to innovate without forgetting the cultures that led to the development of the region.

When I used to run this trail for cross country, skiing, and track in high school, it was unrefined. Now it is becoming a capstone of the Burlington waterfront. The surfaces are much better than they used to be. The vision is forward. North, South, East and West. There is no reason that Vermont cannot be completely connected by rail-trail and bike paths and rural roads. Forward is the direction of bicycles.

As we returned to my dads house I reflected on my 28 years absence from bicycling in Vermont. At 5 years old my dad bought me my first bike, a chopper with a banana seat. It was yellow. A few wrecks in the driveway and I was off in to traffic. I never felt so liberated, such freedom. We moved to the city because my dad didn't want to commute by car. He rode his bike or walked to work almost every day of his teaching career. I know where my half my heart came from.

BMX came in fast and I couldn't afford a new bike in that era because my family moved to Europe and that was expensive. When we returned BMX was losing popularity so I (my Dad) bought a Peugot road bike. I road that bike on what was called the "Burlington Bike Path" hundreds of miles. I road all over town on that bike for four years.

Then along came mountain bikes. By this point I was working almost full time, so I was able to save enough money to buy a Specialized Rock Hopper Comp (forest service green) 1988. I still ride it, and it is worth considerably more than the 689USD I paid for it. Best bike ever. I rode that one in Vermont, Oregon, Washington, Montana, Arizona, New Mexico and Idaho. Now, I think Carmen is slowly moving towards retirement. It is hard to retire a bike. That bike took me from high school to prosperity. Not the same thing as putting down a loyal pet, but that bike was my wingman in the early years of my adulthood.

So, back in Burlington...pre-ride. I have no bike. I flew out so it just made more sense to rent one one in Burlington.

I am weak, so I just wandered into my favorite outdoor store, found a very well priced (gravel grinder) crossover and bought it. The staff were almost jealous. Everyone had their eye on this bike. Now I have to justify it to my wife.

Truth be told I bought it for selfish reasons--I wanted it. Secondary is my justification, which is sincere. Health.

My dad is 75. 76 this July. He had no problem riding the 22 miles in 6 degree 40mph wind. I have two sisters that have four boys total, all between age 10 and 14. All about as tall as I am. Between my sisters and their spouses, and the nephews, there are 8 people who can ride this bike with my dad.

It is a chance to bond and breathe a bit too. This bike is bigger than any of us.

The Island Line Trail is a work in progress in the context of the greater effort to connect our continent with smooth, car free cycle zones. Imagine, if I didn't need to own a car I could easily take an extra month off each year, and travel by bike to Vermont. Each time I would buy another bike and still be money ahead to eat at many fine restaurants along the way.

My only fear is the mid west. 1000 miles of mono-culture, and it runs 1000 miles north south too. There is no escape from the swing of catharsis and boredom in these situations. Perhaps a quick stop in Colorado is required before dropping into America's skateboard ramp. If you don't use your breaks you can roll clear to the Mississippi.

Just kidding.

I hope the larger message has come across in this post. I wish for all bicycle enthusiasts to see it as a venue for maintaining quality of relationships with friends and family until health eclipses intention. Until that impasse I will try to keep all of my loved ones active.

Peace

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